Joy of Missing Out

Your Ego Is Their Competitive Advantage

Your ego is their competitive advantage.

Your complacency is their competitive advantage.

Your procrastination is their competitive advantage.

Your impatience is their competitive advantage.

Your laziness is their competitive advantage.

Your inflexibility is their competitive advantage.

Your jealousy and the decisions you allow it to drive is their competitive advantage.

Your bitterness from clinging to a grudge is their competitive advantage.

Your glorification of busy is their competitive advantage.

Your “no new friends” rule is their competitive advantage.

Your bubble is their competitive advantage.

Your red tape is their competitive advantage.

Your lack of process is their competitive advantage.

Your lack of research is their competitive advantage.

Your preference for short cuts over healthier, organic growth is their competitive advantage.

Your inability to prioritize your time is their competitive advantage.

Your micromanagement is their competitive advantage.

Your refusal to do the boring, unglamorous, tedious work is their competitive advantage.

Your insistence on putting all your eggs in the Instagram basket is their competitive advantage.

Your being ‘too good' to attend that event is their competitive advantage.

Your habit of indulging your FOMO (fear of missing out) rather than strategic JOMO (joy of missing out) is their competitive advantage.

Your refusal to ask for help is their competitive advantage.

Your staying within your comfort zone is their competitive advantage.

Your never raising your hand to ask questions is their competitive advantage.

Your nostalgia for the “good old days” of the industry in 2014/2004/1994 is their competitive advantage.

Work smarter. Work harder. It’s not an either/or scenario, and hasn’t been for a long time.

Leaving Room For The Miracle

Luck's kryptonite? Busyness.

People who find their identity through a jam-packed schedule are rarely lucky.

To be fair, busyness is often a symptom of something deeper: a desire to be seen as "important," an inability to say no out of a need to have everyone like us, fear of opportunities going to someone else even if they're a good but not great fit for us, fear that if we slow down we might have to face the fact that maybe the life we've built for ourselves isn't exactly the one we wanted.

Lucky people have more boundaries, not less. They say no more often so that they have room to say yes to things that truly excite them. They are comfortable embracing a philosophy of JOMO (joy of missing out) rather than FOMO (fear of missing out). They are willing to risk not being liked by saying no. They are okay with being misunderstood for a while. They understand that your priorities do not need to be their priorities and vice versa.

Most lucky people don't plan for luck (or even believe it exists), but they do make space for it. They don't fly in to a conference or event for one session and then fly right back out. They stick around and talk to people. They know that "what's in it for me?" isn't always the right question to ask. They recognize that opportunities often look like work and show up through people or places they don't expect.

I call all of this "leaving room for the miracle."

Lucky people leave room for the miracle.


Originally published January 2012

The Joy of Missing Out

We tend to fear missing out more than we fear mediocrity.

Saying yes to every opportunity and hiding behind choices that only serve to make us look good in the eyes of others results in a lack of focus and muddled vision. It also depletes emotional, physical and financial resources that could be used to pursue the goals we truly value instead.

You weren’t designed to do or be everything. Pursuing excellence means embracing the joy of missing out.


Originally published October 2014