Business Failure

When Brands Derail


When brands go off course, it's usually not because of one circumstance that can be pinpointed. Instead, it's a slippery slope of seemingly minor decisions and inconsequential actions. A cranky reply here, an apathetic "good enough" there — all of these add up over time.

The math associated with this is where it turns unfair, because instead of adding up one by one, it functions like compound interest. Out of nowhere a major, brand-threatening problem appears, but in reality it was there all along, growing exponentially larger under an unfocused eye.

The converse is true as well: seemingly minor decisions and inconsequential actions — done well, done right — multiply quickly. The math here is the same, but this time it's what your competition calls your "lucky break."
 


Originally published March 2013

We Tried That Once, It Didn't Work

A common mistake people often make is refusing to try something again that didn't work before.

On the surface trying something again that failed in the past may seem counterintuitive. The reality, however, is that outcomes are driven by many things: circumstances, the market, your audience, your company's infrastructure, and your mindset, just to name a few. If any of those things have changed over time, then something that didn't work for you five or ten years ago may work now.

Proceed with wisdom, obviously, but don't be afraid to proceed.
 


Originally published March 2012

When Brands Derail

When brands go off course, it's usually not because of one circumstance that can be pinpointed. Instead, it's a slippery slope of seemingly minor decisions and inconsequential actions. A cranky reply here, an apathetic "good enough" there — all of these add up over time.

The math associated with this is where it turns unfair, because instead of adding up one by one, it functions like compound interest. Out of nowhere a major, brand-threatening problem appears, but in reality it was there all along, growing exponentially larger under an unfocused eye.

The converse is true as well: seemingly minor decisions and inconsequential actions — done well, done right — multiply quickly. The math here is the same, but this time it's what your competition calls your "lucky break."
 


Originally published March 2013