Competition

Why 'Stay In Your Lane' Is Terrible Advice

99% of the time someone tells you to "stay in your lane" you can rightfully interpret it as, "Your talent and/or success threatens me and I'm afraid I'm becoming irrelevant because of it." 

Should you try to be all things to all people or a "Jack of all trades"? No, and that's not what this is about.

If your skillset allows you to pursue new opportunities that make sense for your brand, your family, and your goals, go after them. You don't need permission from those who would rather see you fail or, worse, coast along in joyless mediocrity.

Your goals belong to you and ambition is not a dirty word. You don't need your competitors to sign off on your business plan. 


Originally published April 2014

Assuming the Worst

One of the biggest mistakes people make in business is writing someone off because of one aspect about that person that they may not like. This often leads to soured relationships and underestimating the competition.

We're all human and we're all flawed in one way or another. You don't have to agree with someone 100% of the time, but disagreeing with them doesn't automatically make them a bad person or a terrible company.

Be careful not to throw the baby out with the bathwater. Assuming that one flaw or difference in opinion defines the whole is a dangerous practice in both business and life.
 


Originally published May 2010

Raise the Bar

The records set at the 1936 Olympics later became the qualifying standards for the 1972 Olympics.

You can either spend your time setting new standards and raising the bar for the industry or you can spend it catching up with the people who do.

Hoping that things will go backwards or return to "the good old days" is a waste of time and, more importantly, a waste of your talent.


Originally published September 2012