Habit Change

24 Ways You Give Your Competitors An Advantage

Stop self-sabotaging and step up your game.

Photo by    Cameron Clark

Photo by Cameron Clark

Your ego is their competitive advantage.

Your complacency is their competitive advantage.

Your procrastination is their competitive advantage.

Your impatience is their competitive advantage.

Your laziness is their competitive advantage.

Your inflexibility is their competitive advantage.

Your jealousy and the decisions you allow it to drive is their competitive advantage.

Your bitterness from clinging to a grudge is their competitive advantage.

Your glorification of busy is their competitive advantage.

Your “no new friends” rule is their competitive advantage.

Your red tape is their competitive advantage.

Your lack of process is their competitive advantage.

Your lack of research is their competitive advantage.

Your preference for short cuts over healthier, organic growth is their competitive advantage.

Your inability to prioritize your time is their competitive advantage.

Your micromanagement is their competitive advantage.

Your refusal to do the boring, unglamorous, tedious work is their competitive advantage.

Your insistence on putting all your eggs in the Instagram basket is their competitive advantage.

Your being ‘too good' to attend that event is their competitive advantage.

Your habit of indulging your FOMO (fear of missing out) rather than strategic JOMO (joy of missing out) is their competitive advantage.

Your refusal to ask for help is their competitive advantage.

Your staying within your comfort zone is their competitive advantage.

Your never raising your hand to ask questions is their competitive advantage.

Your nostalgia for the “good old days” of the industry in 2014/2004/1994 is their competitive advantage.

Work smarter. Work harder. It’s not an either/or scenario, and hasn’t been for a long time.


Originally posted October 2018

Making Change Happen

Photo by    Cameron Clark

Photo by Cameron Clark


We know what we’re supposed to do yet we don’t do it.

The solutions seem simple and trite.

Surely the people who are more successful have more complex routines and productivity secrets.

Surely profound life change doesn’t really come from small habits that add up like compound interest.

Write things down, set goals, carve out time in your schedule solely to sit and think, eat breakfast, drink enough water, stretch and move more, reply to emails quickly, send handwritten thank you notes. It’s all just a little too obvious.

The magic is in the obvious.
 


Originally published May 2014

Being Generous When You Think You Can't and Why It Matters

Wedding at    Amangiri   . Photo by    Cameron Clark   .

Wedding at Amangiri. Photo by Cameron Clark.


Generous people change the world. Not because of what or how much they give, but because they are doers and see possibilities where others don't. 

There's a quote I love that says, "If you won't be generous with $10, you won't be generous with $10,000."

It's true. 

If you don't build up the muscle of generosity when it seems you don't have as much financially to give, that habit won't suddenly materialize when you have more.

If you're not used to giving or if it feels intimidating, it's okay. Just remember that nothing changes if nothing changes. Make a commitment to start small. Donate $1 from every sale you make this year, starting today. 

Smaller amounts do still make a difference to organizations, but more importantly, the act gets you in the habit of giving and begins to change you into a more generous person.

The phrase "give back" is often used in relation to generosity, but I'd encourage you to adopt a "give as you go" mantra instead. The world needs you and your commitment to an optimism that things can get better, now.